Your confidence is what has made you a successful attorney. It got you through law school, helped you navigate courtrooms and gave you the momentum to start your own practice. But when it comes to your law firm’s website, that same confidence could be a handicap.

In our recent white paper, Why Most Law Firm Websites are Designed to Fail: Logic, Emotion and Today’s Legal Consumer, we outline eight psychological motivators that influence website visitors to contact your firm. One of those motivators is selfishness. In short, selfishness drives website visitors to choose the firm that best answers, “What’s in it for me?”

Too often attorneys’ websites are consumed with ego-driven content: educational certifications, publications, past cases, bar association memberships and the like. Although these are noteworthy accomplishments, they don’t speak to consumers in need of legal help.

Think about it. Does a dad who is going through a divorce and looking to keep custody of his kids understand the meaning of (or care about) your involvement in Arnold v. Williams 328 N.W. 2d 518 (U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit 1985)?

Here is the good news: you don’t have to sacrifice your hard-earned accolades in the name of marketing. Rather, you should position them in a way that shows how they can benefit a potential client. With that in mind, here are three tips:

  • Speak Directly to the Consumer – Instead of regurgitating your accolades, explain why those awards matter. Saying something like, “As one of our clients, you will always know that a dedicated attorney is working hard for you. Our first priority is providing our clients with excellent representation. When you work with us, you will see why others in our community have consistently recognized our firm with awards and recognition.”
  • Don’t Flex Your Legalese Muscle – Your potential clients probably aren’t lawyers. Don’t let your website become bogged down by dry legal writing. Although you may initially appear very qualified, clients who do not feel an emotional connection to your firm will be driven away because you do not clearly articulate how you can help them.
  • Be Emotional – Put yourself in your clients’ shoes. Perhaps they’ve been charged with a crime or are going through a bankruptcy. Legal issues generally come with emotional situations, so you need to lead with emotional and inspirational content such as a reassuring headshot image and content that indicates how you understand their needs.

You know your clients better than anyone. Now, it’s time to ensure that your website clearly communicates how well you understand their needs, even if that means putting aside your own.

If you’re interested in learning about the other seven motivators we explored in our recent white paper, click here.

Share Button